Grades are in: Nevada's Immunization Report Card Sees Improvements

The most recent survey data indicates many Nevada parents are protecting their children from vaccine-preventable diseases by making sure they are getting recommended vaccines.

Promising Immunization Rates for Nevada

The recently released 2016 National Immunization Survey (NIS-Teen) shows improvements, especially in human papillomavirus (HPV) immunization rates among males.

Preventing cancer just got a little easier. That’s a big deal.

The official news at the end of 2016 was a change to the recommendation for HPV (human papillomavirus) vaccination, reducing the recommended number of doses from three to just two for girls and boys who initiate the series at ages 9 through 14 years.

This new recommendation reduces the number of doses of the vaccine required, yet is still effective in preventing HPV infections and HPV-associated diseases, including cancers. That means fewer office visits for boys and girls, and less vaccine stored by health care providers.

Immunization Rates Show Big Gains for Children and Teens in Nevada

The 2015 National Immunization Survey (NIS) shows that toddler immunization rates increased by 5.5 percent - the most significant increase in Nevada history.

HPV Prevention is Simple. So Why Are Young Nevadans Not Vaccinating?

What if you could just get a simple vaccine to prevent cancer?
Turns out, you can. But more on that in a second.

Put On Your Own Oxygen Mask First: Protect Yourself to Protect Others

You’ve likely heard this common flight attendant refrain: “In case of emergency, put on your own oxygen mask first before assisting others.”

Advice from a Doctor: Check Your Sources

HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) vaccine | Immunize Nevada

One of my friends recently posted an article about the HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) vaccine.  When I clicked on the link,

HPV vaccines: Additional call-to-action by healthcare providers needed

Photo Courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control

Although the quadrivalent HPV vaccine was approved for use in the US in 2006, the latest Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) data shows only 57% of females and 35% of males received at least 1 dose, with far less finishing the three dose series.  In fact, the HPV vaccine has the lowest completion rates of any vaccine in the United States, including vaccines that are recommended for the same age groups. In 2013, the Director of the CDC said achieving higher HPV vaccination rates was a top public health priority. Still, achieving higher rates has been a struggle.

HPV Vaccine Could Save Your Child's Life

Photo courtesy of the CDC

When it comes to their kids, parents are always planning. One plan that's easy to make could have a tremendous benefit, even saving a life: planning to have preteens vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV is a sexually transmitted infection that causes genital warts but can also cause cervical cancer, as well as anal, vaginal, vulvar, penile, and oropharyngeal (mouth and throat) cancers. About 17,600 women and 9,300 men are affected by HPV-related cancers each year and nearly all sexually-active people will come in contact with HPV in their lifetime.

KNPR State of Nevada: Immunize Nevada Launches HPV Vaccine Campaign

When we hear about HPV – the more common term for the human papillomavirus, the conversation usually focuses on young women and the risk of cervical cancer. In reality, HPV is a much larger health issue for women and men. Some even go so far as to say it is a crisis.

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